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Five Important Strategies for New Seminarians

1. Find a church home quickly. Sanctification of the Lord’s day, sitting under God’s word preached, receiving the Lord’s supper, and caring for and being cared for by God’s people is indispensable to your spiritual well-being and (if married) your family’s. Don’t prolong your search.

Your adjustment may be tough. Don’t be discouraged. It’s part of your preparation for ministry. All pastors work with people who struggle to fit into new church homes. A few years from now, you will too. Therefore, right now, you and your family’s struggles to fit in are equipping you for ministry. They are one of many ways God is at work to make you a sympathetic shepherd of your flock.

2. Don’t pit your studies against your devotional life. During my first year at Princeton, I stumbled upon a copy of B.B. Warfield’s The Religious Life of Theological Students and received perhaps the most helpful counsel of my seminary career: Make your turning to the books a turning to God. Before you open a text, ask the Lord to give you an increased knowledge of his character and of your need of grace. Seek from him a deeper understanding of his word and world. Fill your time in the books with prayers of adoration, thanksgiving, confession, repentance, and renewal. If you do, you’ll establish enduring study habits to the glory of God.

3. Guard your study time. Most of us only get one shot at seminary; misuse the time, and you will finish your studies inadequately prepared. Even if it were possible to learn later what you miss now, the forfeited opportunity costs are steep. For years you will labor without the benefit of what could have been yours from the start.

On campus and in church, you will be asked to serve in many ways. Before you say “yes,” make sure that your studies are squared away. Take to heart the old adage: “Do what you have to do, then do what you want to do.”

Don’t succumb to the temptation of thinking of your studies as competition to service to the Lord. Right now, your time reading and writing and in the lecture hall is your primary field of service.  Should you serve in other ways? Most definitely, but not before you are sure you can meet your academic requirements.

4. Watch your spending. Most of the time, family conflict about money has its roots not in scarcity, but in negligence. Many students and their spouses don’t think carefully about their finances. The consequences can be dire: strained relationships, overwork, and, sometimes, withdrawal from seminary and the abandoning of plans for ministry.

Don’t let that be your story. Spend less than you earn. Get and stay on a budget. Put on paper where your money will go. If you don’t know how, ask for help, and the sooner the better.

It breaks my heart to hear stories of men who prepare for ministry, but then must turn down a pastoral call because their debt makes it impossible. Learn the fundamentals of financial management now, and reap its rewards for a lifetime.

5. Eliminate distractions when you’re studying, at home, and with the Lord. When you set aside time to study, be fully engaged. Turn off email and all notifications; silence your cell phone; refuse to surf the web.

When you return home, give your wife and children your full attention; put your phone, books, and computer away.

During your personal devotions, be fully engaged with the Lord and his word.

When you eliminate distractions and concentrate on the task before you, you’ll be surprised at how much you accomplish and grow in your work and relationships.

Seminary has its share of opportunities and trials. The lessons learned here will go with you to your first church; resolve to make these habits your own, and they too will follow you throughout your ministry

 

Wherever The Spirit of Christ Is

Wherever the Spirit of Christ is, He . . .
Reveals Christ to the understanding,
Enthrones Christ in the affections,
Gives Christ the control of the will,
Endears Christ to the heart,
Glorifies Christ in the soul, and
Conforms the person to the lovely likeness of Christ.
– James Smith (1802-1862)
In Mark Jones, Knowing Christ (Banner of Truth, 2015), 61.

Dr. Guy Waters on Paedocommunion

My RTS Jackson  colleague Dr. Guy Waters responds to the question, “Is Paedocommunion Biblical?”

The Duties and Services Christ Requires

“It is a sad and dangerous thing to have two eyes to behold our dignity and privileges, and not one to see our duties and services. I should look  with one eye upon the choice and excellent things that Chris hath done for me, to raise up my heart to love Christ with the purest love, and to joy in Christ with the strongest joy, and to lift up Christ above all, who hath made himself to be my all; and I should look with the other eye upon those services and duties that the Scriptures require of those for whom Christ hath done such blessed things, as upon that of the apostle: ‘What, know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost, which is in you, which ye have of God? and ye are not your own: for ye are bought with a price; therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God’s” (1 Corinthians 6:19-20).

– Thomas Brooks, Precious Remedies Against Satan’s Devices, 1652 (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 2011), 122.

If You Would Have a Peaceful Conscience

“If we would have a peaceful conscience in our religion, let us see that our views of saving faith are distinct and clear. Let us beware of supposing that justifying faith is anything more than a sinner’s simple trust in a Saviour, the grasp of a drowning man on the hand held out for his relief. – Let us beware of mingling anything else with faith in the matter of justification. Here we must always remember that faith stands entirely alone. A justified man no doubt will always be a holy man. True believing will always be accompanied by godly living. But what gives a man an interest in Christ, is not his living, but his faith. If we would know whether our faith is genuine, we do well to ask ourselves how we are living. But if we would know whether we are justified by Christ, there is but one question to be asked. That question is, ‘Do we believe?'”

– J.C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on John, Vol 1. 1869. (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth Trust, 2012), 103.

Can We Ever Think Too Highly of Christ?

“Can we ever give too much honour to Christ? Can we ever think too highly of him? . . . Men may easily fall into error about the three persons in the holy Trinity, if they do not carefully adhere to the teaching of Scripture. But no man ever errs on the side of giving too much honour to God the Son. Christ is the meeting-point between the Trinity and the sinner’s soul. ‘He that honoureth not the Son honoureth not the Father which hath sent him’ (John 5:23).”

– J.C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on John, Vol 1. 1869. (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth Trust, 2012), 27.

Your Greatest Burden

2Q==Every believer has his share of trials, sorrows, and burdens. Paul warns that “through many tribulations we must enter the kingdom of God” (Acts 14:22).

But if you identified all of your burdens and ranked them, which would be the greatest? John Owen helps us prioritize. He concludes, “I do not understand how a man can be a sincere believer unto whom sin is not the greatest burden and sorrow.” (1)

The gravity of sin is revealed in the costliness of our redemption, a reality that Isaiah unfolds solemnly in his fifty-third chapter. At Golgotha we see our Savior “stricken, smitten by God, and afflicted.” For our salvation “the Lord laid on him the iniquity of us all.”

The poet Thomas Kelly knew that when when the penitent believer looks at the cross through the eyes of faith, he can never again be flippant about his sin:

Ye who think of sin but lightly,
Nor suppose the evil great,
Here may view its nature rightly,
Here its guilt may estimate.
Mark the Sacrifice appointed!
See who bears the awful load!
’Tis the Word, the Lord’s Anointed,
Son of Man, and Son of God. (2)

Is the burden of your sin your greatest grief and sorrow? Then there is comfort for you in Jesus’ gospel. “Surely he has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows.”

___________

(1) John Owen, “The Grace and Duty of Being Spiritually Minded” in The Works of John Owen: Sin and Grace. Vol. 7. Edited  by William H. Goold. 1850-1853 (Edinburgh: Banner of Truth, 1994), 333.

(2) Thomas Kelley, “Stricken, Smitten, and Afflicted” in Trinity Hymnal, no. 257.