Resources on History – Church

A Gospel Encounter that Changed the World

By Charlie Wingard · November 11, 2013 · 0 Comments
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In the first half of the 20th century, millions of Russians disappeared into the gulags of the Soviet police state. Many of these were condemned on trumped up charges. Unjustly declared enemies of the state, they became victims of communism’s cruel tyranny. Still, in the midst of horrible evil, faithful men proclaimed Christ. And one extraordinary encounter changed not only a man but also the world. James Montgomery Boice recalls: “One of the inmates of the notorious Russian prisons was a Jewish doctor by the name of Boris Nicholayevich Kornfeld. He was a political prisoner of the Stalinist era. But he was treated better than most simply because doctors were scarce. Guards got sick as well as prisoners, and no…

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Martin Luther (1483-1546)

By Charlie Wingard · November 10, 2013 · 0 Comments
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Martin Luther was born November 10, 1483. On this anniversary of his birth enjoy these reflections of John Piper on Luther’s life and work. If you are interested in reading one of Luther’s works, I would recommend starting with Bondage of the Will.  My favorite biography of Luther is Luther: The Reformer by James M. Kittelson. I’ve also profited from reading  Roland Bainton and Heiko Oberman’s biographies. Martin Luther exhorted ministers of the word: “Some pastors and preachers are lazy and no good. They do not pray; they do not read; they do not search the Scripture … The call is: watch, study attend to reading. In truth you cannot read too much in Scripture; and what you read you…

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John Calvin on the Lord’s Supper

By Charlie Wingard · October 2, 2013 · 0 Comments
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A critical question in the historic controversies regarding the Lord’s Supper is: Where is Christ’s physical body when the Supper is served? The Western Church puts forward three major answers. First, Rome teaches that the body and blood of Christ are present not only in heaven, but also physically in the bread and wine. At the time of their consecration at the Mass, the bread becomes the actual body of Christ and the wine becomes the actual blood of Christ. The outward appearance of the bread and wine remain unchanged, but their substance (what the elements really are) is changed into Christ’s body and blood. This view is known as “transubstantiation.” (See Westminster Confession of Faith, 29.6). Second, Lutherans reject…

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Anselm of Canterbury (1033-1109): A Prayer to God

By Charlie Wingard · August 23, 2013 · 0 Comments
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Intellectual genius, courage, piety, and administrative skill make Anselm of Canterbury one of the most admired Christians of his age. Born in northern Italy, he accepted the formidable task of establishing order in the English church, serving as archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of two kings who demanded the right to appoint bishops in the church.  Anselm demurred. Conflict and exiles were the stiff price he paid for his principled stand. His most famous work, Cur deus homo (usually translated, Why God Became Man) presents his doctrine of Christ’s atoning work. Sin insults God’s honor, and man is forever lost unless he makes satisfaction. But this fallen man cannot do; sin is too grave, too outrageous. Wonderfully, the Triune…

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